The old Los Angeles County Courthouse, with City Hall in the background, downtown Los Angeles, late 1920s

The old Los Angeles County Courthouse, with City Hall in the background, downtown Los Angeles, late 1920sHere we have a great photo taken in downtown Los Angeles in the late 1920s. In the foreground is the majestic old Los Angeles County Courthouse, which we lost in 1936 after it was seriously damaged in the Long Beach earthquake of 1933. Rising in the background is the iconic Los Angeles City Hall, which would have just opened when this shot was taken. Fortunately it’s still around so I guess one out of two ain’t bad.

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2 Responses to The old Los Angeles County Courthouse, with City Hall in the background, downtown Los Angeles, late 1920s

  1. FANTASTIC! During my days as a publicist (1950-54) I visited both the Times and the Examiner buildings often to plant stories. Times building was SO much better. I recall the elevator in the Examiner building which was so ancient one never knew if this was going to be your final ride. Love always, Blue&Lou.

  2. Jean Hunter says:

    Interesting picture with so much detail and contrast (shadows and light) Looks like a painting or illustration unless it’s just my perception. Notice the pedestrian on the sidewalk and the small group spilling out from the walkway further ahead, the line of various autos, the stooped-over gardener with his trimmings cart tending to the grounds, the beautiful globe lamps that appear to be lit. The vivid outline of the courthouse and palm trees against the stark white of City Hall.

    I wonder if this was the courthouse where early stars went for their divorces, name changes (Harlow legally changed hers in ’35) and other miscellaneous things.

    Spectacular find of the early Golden Age of Hollywood, Martin!

    Thanks –

    Jean